3d Printing Computational Architecture

3d printed architecture columns

We have seen brief glimpses into what the future of architecture has been with stories about 3d printed houses. But only when 3d printed architectural components are inexpensive enough to realistically use in houses will we see the true capability. A vision of this possible future is given in Michael Hansmeyer’s Computational Architecture project.

Hansmeyer explores using algorithms to repeatedly subdivide traditional columns. Each subdivision alters the topology and creates another layer of modern baroque style ornamentation. The results are part Geiger, part Second Lift, and part baroque. For his project, Hansmeyer used a laser cutter and CNC mill to slice the pieces, but since the design is digital, it’s equally feasible to 3d print them.

algorithmic columns

Hansmeyer is one of the first using 3d design and 3d printing as an integral part of the design. These columns could not exist without the algorithmic complexity the 3d design allows. They are undrawable and perhaps unimaginable without the 3d design. They embrace the medium and are defined by it at the same time.

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January 4, 2013
Categories: Fractal Printing, News